ATR Finance Officer Nov 19

ATR Finance Officer

Annual Training Review (ATR) ensures all staff review their working practices at least once each year. Not only is this a requirement to maintain our blood banking license with the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), it also allows you to maintain your knowledge and understanding and identify areas you may need additional training in.

The following course covers all the SOPs and MDPs  in the below lessons that form the annual review for your role as Finance Officer.

The period for you to complete your ATR closes Saturday 30th November at midnight.

Training will print and store your certificate once you successfully complete the course.

ATR Marketing Assistant Nov 19

ATR Marketing Assistant

Annual Training Review (ATR) ensures all staff review their working practices at least once each year. Not only is this a requirement to maintain our blood banking license with the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), it also allows you to maintain your knowledge and understanding and identify areas you may need additional training in.

The following course covers all the SOPs and MDPs  in the below lessons that form the annual review for your role as Marketing Assistant.

The period for you to complete your ATR closes Saturday 30th November at midnight.

Training will print and store your certificate once you successfully complete the course.

ATR Marketing Manager Nov 19

ATR Marketing Manager

Annual Training Review (ATR) ensures all staff review their working practices at least once each year. Not only is this a requirement to maintain our blood banking license with the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), it also allows you to maintain your knowledge and understanding and identify areas you may need additional training in.

The following course covers all the SOPs and MDPs  in the below lessons that form the annual review for your role as Marketing Manager.

The period for you to complete your ATR closes Saturday 30th November at midnight.

Training will print and store your certificate once you successfully complete the course.

IDEXX VetConnect Plus Training

IDEXX VetConnect Plus Training Introduction

The following lesson contains a 7-8 minute video presentation covering the basics of using the IDEXX VetConnect Plus online system.

The training covers:

  • Additional IDEXX Training Support
  • How to log-in
  • Finding and viewing donor results
  • The results format
  • Viewing past results
  • Graphical representations of sequential results
  • Printing and saving results
  • Sharing/emailing results
  • Requesting an IDEXX expert consult
  • Ordering additional tests

 

To log in go to:

Log In

Use the username: p273admin

Password: petbloodbank

 

The IDEXX Learning Center can be found here:

IDEXX Learning Center

As always, please get in touch with the Training Department if you feel you need additional training on this topic.

Canine Haematoma Classification

Canine Haematoma Classification

To better standardise our recording of canine haematomas following blood donation the following classification system has been agreed.

A more standardised system will enable better tracking of haematoma sizes and potentially techniques to minimise their occurrence.

 

 

 

 

PBB Mobile Unit Training

Overview

The following course provides training on the Mobile Unit, showing all the features and how they are used.

 

 

The course is split into four lessons explaining:

  1. The chargers
  2. The external features of the Mobile Unit
  3. The internal features of the Mobile Unit
  4. The control panels within the Mobile Unit

 

 

In addition, there is a guidance document (below) INF.EQU.15 which covers setting up and closing down the MU:

  1. Setting up the MU before you leave for a session
  2. What to do when you arrive at a session
  3. What to do before leaving a session
  4. What to do when you arrive back at Loughborough

This document can also be found on Nexus, on the collection USB and in the collection folder.

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Once you have completed the course there is a short quiz to take before your completion certificate is generated.

ATR Veterinary Surgeon (ALL) Nov 2019

ATR Veterinary Surgeon 2019

Annual Training Reviews (ATR) ensure all staff review their working practices at least once each year. Not only is this a requirement to maintain our blood banking license with the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), it also allows you to maintain your knowledge and understanding and identify areas you may need additional training in.

The following course covers all the SOPs and MDPs that form the annual review for your role as a veterinary surgeon. It is separated into sections based on the policy review documents the questions relate to. It is probably best to work through the lessons in bite-size sessions as the course will record your progress and allow you to log in and out.

Each question needs to be passed to move on to the next. All the SOPs are available on NEXUS for you to consult.

In addition the ATR includes a few new training lessons that have been included to address non-conformances and key focuses for the company for example the ‘On Session Communication Lessons’.

Please be aware the Donor Adverse Reaction SOP is being updated so this will follow separately to the ATR once it has been finalised.

Please ensure that you are referring to the SOPs and MPDs on NEXUS regularly to ensure you are not deviating from protocol and also to be guided to the correct associated documents and forms to perform a task. Ensure you are using the most current versions of all documentation by always going direct to Nexus and not printing and using any hard copies.

The period for you to complete your ATR closes Saturday 30th November at midnight.

The course needs to be completed on a PC or laptop and the screen size may need adjusting for the drag and drop exercises to ensure all words and spaces are visible so they can be completed.

Training will print and store your certificate once you successfully complete the course.

RCVS Mandatory CPD Check

This is also a good time to check your mandatory RCVS CPD compliance. For a veterinary surgeon this is a total of 105 hours over a three year period, with an average of 35 hours each year. PBB requests all staff CPD records at the end of March each year. If you feel you will be unable to fulfill the minimum requirements please contact the Training Department so we can arrange whatever support we can to assist you.

Good luck!

Pre-screening and Registration SOP/COL/01-03

Pre-screen Training

The following course is an interactive presentation on the pre-screening and registration process for all donors arriving at the collection session. The course covers the content of the Collection SOPs 1 through 3.

Once you have completed the presentation, take the associated quiz.

 

Ancillary Blood Products Guide

This course is to help you familiarise yourself with the consumables that veterinary practices can order from Pet Blood Bank in addition to blood products. It is not intended to be a full clinical guide, but instead an overview of what each product is used for in practice.

Each consumable has a very short video explanation showing the product and highlighting any key features.

The consumables are separated into 3 areas based on their clinical use:

  • Diagnostic testing
  • Blood collection
  • Blood administration

There is a quick interactive activity at the end of each section for you to complete.

Line Managers

The term “line manager” relates to individuals who have members of staff or teams directly reporting to them and who have responsibility for them to a higher level of management.

Examples of typical responsibilities a line manager may carry out include:

 

  • Day-to-day people management
  • Organisation of work allocation and rotas
  • Monitoring work processes
  • Checking quality
  • Dealing with customers/clients
  • Measuring operational performance
  • Recruitment and selection
  • On-going performance management and undertaking performance appraisals.

This course is designed to cover all the processes and tasks which are required by the Line Managers at Pet Blood Bank. Along with providing some helpful tips and tools in Line Managing.

Please select each lesson below to take you through the course. There will be a mini quiz at the end of each lesson which requires 100% to allow you to move onto the next lesson.

Hope you enjoy and if there is anything else that you feel would be useful to be covered in this course please email cpd@petbloodbankuk.org.

Manual Handling

Manual Handling

Manual handling relates to the moving of items either by lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing or pulling. The weight of the item is an important factor, but many other factors can create a risk of injury, for example the number of times you have to pick up or carry an item, the distance you are carrying it,  stretching or other awkward posture you may adopt while doing a task.

What’s the Problem?

Incorrect manual handling is one of the most common causes of injury at work. It causes work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD’s) which account for over a third of all workplace injuries.

What do I have to do?

To help prevent manual handling injuries in the workplace, you should avoid such tasks as far as possible. However, where it is not possible to avoid handling a load, employers must look at the risks of that task and put sensible health and safety measures in place to prevent and avoid injury.

For any lifting activity

Always take into account:

  • individual capability
  • the nature of the load
  • environmental conditions
  • training

If you need to lift something manually

  • Reduce the amount of twisting, stooping and reaching
  • Avoid lifting from floor level or above shoulder height, especially heavy loads
  • Adjust storage areas to minimise the need to carry out such movements
  • Consider how you can minimise carrying distances
  • Assess the weight to be carried and whether the worker can move the load safely or needs any help – maybe the load can be broken down to smaller, lighter components

Lifting Donors

  • Donors should be lifted with at least 2 people (very large dogs require 3-4)
  • First person stand at the dogs shoulder with one arm around the dogs neck the other arm around the dogs chest behind the forelimbs
  • Second person stand by the hindquarters and place one arm around the abdomen just in front of the hindlimbs and the other arm around the back of the pelvis
  • Lift dog and gently lie onto table
  • Third person stands on opposite of the table to receive the dog and apply light restraint.

For more information on this please see INF/ADM/34

You will receive practical training on this whilst on session.

Good handling technique for lifting

There are some simple things to do before and during the lift/carry:

  • Remove obstructions from the route.
  • For a long lift, plan to rest the load midway on a table or bench to change grip.
  • Keep the load close to the waist. The load should be kept close to the body for as long as possible while lifting.
  • Keep the heaviest side of the load next to the body.
  • Adopt a stable position and make sure your feet are apart, with one leg slightly forward to maintain balance

Think before lifting/handling. Plan the lift. Can handling aids be used? Where is the load going to be placed? Will help be needed with the load? Remove obstructions such as discarded wrapping materials. For a long lift, consider resting the load midway on a table or bench to change grip.

Adopt a stable position. The feet should be apart with one leg slightly forward to maintain balance (alongside the load, if it is on the ground). Be prepared to move your feet during the lift to maintain your stability. Avoid tight clothing or unsuitable footwear, which may make this difficult.

Get a good hold. Where possible, the load should be hugged as close as possible to the body. This may be better than gripping it tightly with hands only.

Start in a good posture. At the start of the lift, slight bending of the back, hips and knees is preferable to fully flexing the back (stooping) or fully flexing the hips and knees (squatting).

Don’t flex the back any further while lifting. This can happen if the legs begin to straighten before starting to raise the load.

Keep the load close to the waist. Keep the load close to the body for as long as possible while lifting. Keep the heaviest side of the load next to the body. If a close approach to the load is not possible, try to slide it towards the body before attempting to lift it.

Avoid twisting the back or leaning sideways, especially while the back is bent. Shoulders should be kept level and facing in the same direction as the hips. Turning by moving the feet is better than twisting and lifting at the same time.

Keep the head up when handling. Look ahead, not down at the load, once it has been held securely.

Move smoothly. The load should not be jerked or snatched as this can make it harder to keep control and can increase the risk of injury.

Don’t lift or handle more than can be easily managed. There is a difference between what people can lift and what they can safely lift. If in doubt, seek advice or get help.

Put down, then adjust. If precise positioning of the load is necessary, put it down first, then slide it into the desired position.

 

Lastly please use the link below to see a short video on manual handling.

Manual Handling Video

 

 

 

Induction Part 2

Welcome to the second part of your Induction to Pet Blood Bank

The induction courses are designed for all team members and are the important details that all members of staff regardless of their department need to know about working at Pet Blood Bank.

Read more